Mr. Marí, what happened at the alternative summit?

Brot für die Welt (Bread for the World) did not attend the UNFSS pre-summit in Rome. Instead, the aid organisation took part in a counter-summit. The following conversation with Francisco Marí touched on the reasons for this, the course of events and the outlook for the future.

Vom 25. bis 28. Juli 2021 beteiligten sich laut eigenen Angaben rund 9.000 Menschen an einer überwiegend virtuellen Veranstaltung gegen den Vorgipfel der Vereinten Nationen für Ernährungssysteme (UNFSS) ©2021 FOOD SYSTEMS 4 PEOPLE

By Francisco Marí

Francisco Marí has been working since 2009 as a project officer for lobby and advocacy work in the areas of global nutrition, Agricultural Trade and Maritime Policy at Brot für die Welt (Bread for the World) in the Protestant Agency for Diakonia and Development, focusing on food security, artisanal fisheries, WTO, EU-Africa trade and fisheries agreements, deep-sea mining and the effects of food standards on small-scale producers.

All contributions

Brot für die Welt (BfdW)

Brot für die Welt

By Jan Rübel

Jan Rübel is author at Zeitenspiegel Reportagen, a columnist at Yahoo and writes for national newspapers and magazines. He studied History and Middle Eastern Studies.

All contributions

Mr Marí, your organisation attended the counter-summit to the UNFSS pre-summit. Do you feel that the event went well?

It was a difficult situation. It was no easy decision to counter an initiative of the UN Secretary-General with an alternative summit. After all, we not only support the UN in principle – we are also part of their civic process. We are represented in New York by our church network and for decades we have held most of the same positions as the UN in the debate around nutrition policy. We deeply regretted having to make this decision regarding this summit on food systems and the way in which it was planned and arranged.

 


Did you take a long time to arrive at your decision not to attend?

We had a lengthy dialogue about it, particularly with the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), as well as Special Envoy Agnes Kalibata. We tried very hard to reach an agreement, but sadly our objections fell on deaf ears. As a result, it was a very late decision to give airtime to our, and our partners’, stances and reveal our counterproposals with a parallel event. I am very pleased with how this went, and I’m surprised at how quickly we were able to organise it. There were also a great many scientists in attendance who put forward their suggestions. We engaged in intense discussion. We were unable to reach a complete consensus, of course, but that is not our aim. There are numerous food systems, which can be improved in numerous ways. Nevertheless, everyone at the alternative summit shared a commitment to making decisions on the basis of our human rights obligations, not only regarding the people suffering from hunger, but also regarding the rights of food producers, as adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2018.

 


What are some things you didn’t agree on?

In discussions about organic farming, there were some parties calling for agroecology certificates, while others insisted that we cannot currently turn to these. There was also a lot of debate about seed, specifically how well producers’ own, locally cultivated seed can cope with challenges like climate change, how much research is needed in this area and to what extent this research should remain the remit of the state, while also considering how farmers’ rights can be bolstered. Incidentally, a Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) project funded by the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) revealed the promise of this kind of approach. Brot für die Welt wants to see more projects like this.  

 


How many people attended the summit?

We had a bit of trouble with the virtual format. For the conferences of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), the leading platform for global nutrition, the civil society’s representatives elected at the FAO regional conferences usually travel to Rome a week before the conferences start in order to prepare together. Face-to-face contact and interaction are very important for us, and sadly this wasn’t possible this year. This made it harder for indigenous groups and smallholders to play a significant part in proceedings. These virtual formats pushed by the UNFSS during the Covid-19 pandemic are another point of contention for us.  Many partners are hindered in their participation not only by time differences, but also unreliable and expensive internet connections.  However, considering these challenges, we were very pleased that the individual events were attended by anywhere from 600 to 1,500 people. The livestream received over 9,000 views over the course of the three days.

 


What insights and conclusions were taken from the counter-summit?

That the agricultural industry as an actor should not be treated the same way as those affected by hunger. The alternative summit campaigned for a variety of approaches, but these were based on rights, rather than commercial interests. This is why it was repeatedly argued that we should give those affected a voice and the ability to partake in decision-making, as takes place at the CFS, in order to ensure the future preservation of smallholder production.

So why are you not attending the summit in Rome?

 

This is ultimately down to the approach being unviable.

 

We simply cannot accept corporate interests being equated with human rights, which we have been fighting for for years in our attempts to tackle poverty. Ending world hunger is not just an idea – it’s an obligation, grounded in the human right to food.


But that’s what the summit was dedicated to.

No, this is where the disagreement lies. To me, the pre-summit seemed more like an initiative, where everyone can put forward their ideas, without proper heed being given to who has rights and who has obligations. Starving people have a human right to receive nutrition, whereas the private sector is duty-bound to adhere to laws and pay taxes. Jeffrey Sachs made this clear at the pre-summit, but the event did not reflect this. Meanwhile, the CFS has established exemplary structures for the development and adoption of political decisions that contribute to the fulfilment of the right to food. The UNFSS has not considered these structures at any point.

 

After all the criticism directed at the processes and structures of the UNFSS since 2019, I get the impression that they were consciously and deliberately disregarded.

 

The right to food was never at the heart of the UNFSS. You needn’t look further than the various critical statements made by UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, Michael Fakhri.

 

Did the agricultural industry have a large presence in Rome?

It didn’t have much direct representation at the official summit events, but it has well-established support at the heart of the UNFSS structures, from the Special Envoy to the Scientific Board.  It also dominated the side events: I was shocked at the lack of involvement from NGOs. And of course there were nation states present who have strong ties to the agricultural industry, such as Argentina and the USA.

 


Even at the decisive “main events”, I got the impression that economic actors were a clear minority.

The World Economic Forum (WEF), the stooge for the summit, withdrew when it was no longer necessary for it to present ideas. These ideas were taken on and, as I said previously, many decisive positions for the UNFSS are held by people who have shared interests with the WEF, as well as other trade associations led by the World Business Council – the UN lobbying tool of the world’s largest corporations. And criticism of the agricultural industry’s involvement also led to changes, especially in the summit’s action tracks. Some indigenous groups and NGOs decided to attend – at least those who tend to be active within this construct of the multi-stakeholder approach. A specific section of the scientific community was also present at the summit: one that assists the industry in the development of technocratic proposals and solutions built around new genetic-engineering technologies.

 


Agroecology was another heavily discussed topic at the summit.

To start with, we were very pleased to learn that Senegal wants to lead the agroecology coalition. However, we had already engaged very thoroughly in these debates at the FAO and the CFS together with the producers. So this begs the question: isn’t this coalition merely a copy, or a weakened version, of the FAO’s “Scaling-up Agroecology Initiative” put in place several years ago? We have been calling on the BMZ to boost their support for this initiative for some time.  We don’t need a new UNFSS coalition for that! In fact, the UNFSS process has actively damaged agroecology. For example, just a few weeks ago, CFS policy recommendations on agroecology were subordinated to the UNFSS. In addition, negotiations were supposed to have concluded before the pre-summit. Now we have policy recommendations on agroecology that no longer correspond to those of the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE), and as such do not receive backing from the civil society. One of the reasons for this was that the section on pesticides actually fell short of existing UN agreements. Who benefits from this dilution? The agrochemical sector, of course!  

 


So why not attend the pre-summit in Rome and the summit in New York to advocate for the fulfilment of human rights obligations and agroecology?

Because the UNFSS construct is not inclusive and still doesn’t even have clear rules and structures for co-determination. You get invited to take part, but not in any meaningful way. I know that from marine policy: in the FAO’s Committee on Fisheries, there are no civic mechanisms like those in the CFS. We sit on the sidelines and then, once everyone else has spoken, we get to say our piece. There was a similar structure at the UN Ocean Conference in 2017, with Sustainable Development Goal 14, and we attended because we have no other forum where we could appear alongside the small-scale fishing industry. But even the UNFSS is failing to meet these targets. Were negotiations held even at a single event? Did they work towards a common goal? I saw nothing of the sort in the extensive video portal.

 

There was a colourful tapestry of anxious speeches and presentations of ideas and solutions, but there was no process put forward to unite and organise them, or even identify conflicts of interest between them.

 

In the area of food assistance, we, along with the German federal government, have been campaigning for years for the introduction of an inclusive global structure for nutritional matters, which is based on the right to food and inspired by, but independent of, the FAO – in other words, the aforementioned Committee on World Food Security (CFS). The UNFSS has completely cast this inclusive panel aside. It took immense pressure for the CFS Secretary to be accepted into the UNFSS preparatory panel, but only belatedly and along with many others. The CFS doesn’t have its own exclusive place in the UNFSS, which it deserves as the main body of world food architecture with its human rights approach. It is merely one of many approaches. In downgrading the CFS to an arbitrary platform to achieve the “Zero Hunger” Sustainable Development Goal, the UNFSS has shown itself to be unviable.  

 


Why?

The process of implementing Sustainable Development Goals is already underway. There are good resolutions, and we are seeing willingness within an increasing number of nations to put the recommendations of the CFS into action. But now a Food Systems Summit wants to get in the way of this and reinvent the wheel in a process which is already underway, with solutions that we have long since moved beyond.

 


But there were many solutions discussed at the pre-summit. The issue of tackling global hunger might not be that simple. So why not debate every proposed solution and bring them together in these coalitions?

Again, there are no resolutions. These have been avoided since the beginning. In contrast, at the CFS, we grapple with guideline recommendations for nights on end. They are voluntary, but subject to monitoring. This creates pressure which can be leveraged to good effect. On the other hand, this summit completely forgoes this process, and as I’ve said more than once: our core principle of a human-rights-based approach is of utmost importance to us, and therefore non-negotiable. Coalitions will reach agreements about who does what, which they hope will be productive. These are completely arbitrary, and miles away from what was achieved in the last ten years at the committee in Rome. Decisions have to be made there, whereas the UNFSS forums conceal conflicts of interest. This means that the coalitions are very likely to contradict each other.

 


The food industry is a major player, so it should be involved in decision-making as well. A message of the pre-summit was that the food corporations are part of the problem, but they need to become part of the solution. Does that not mean that you should be working with them to find solutions?

Yes, absolutely As Jeffrey Sachs pointed out, it would already be a huge victory if the major agricultural corporations followed the existing laws and paid their taxes.  If they follow these rules, then it will be possible to sit down and talk to them.  We have been doing exactly this for ten years at the CFS, even with corporations that we know do not always follow the rules, or work with rule-breakers like Monsanto. We have been talking to Bayer for years in Germany. The CFS does also have a commercial mechanism. Initially, they didn’t really take it seriously, but that’s changed. Now we are able to have it out and negotiate our way through the unavoidable conflicts.

 

It’s a matter of balancing the industry’s valid interest in maximising its profits with the rights of those affected by these problems. This should be up to the nation states, smallholders and farmers,

 

but all suggestions are treated equally at the summit. This results in the conflicts of interest being covered up, and the aggregate of these voluntary commitments is treated as the solution.

 


Maybe it’s as Aristotle said: the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Yes, if you’re talking about products, such as spokes in a wheel: alone, they’re useless, but when combined with other parts, they help form a bicycle. But in this scenario, it’s like you have spokes that don’t fit the wheel. Conflicts of interest need to be resolved – and the industry isn’t capable of that.

 


So your fear is that the set-up of this summit will produce a bicycle that can’t be ridden?

Exactly, sometimes it just doesn’t work. For example, you can’t support smallholder production, which has been called for a lot at the summit, while also planning massive acreages for the agricultural industry that require land to be taken from these smallholders.

 


Maybe we need to do both? European agriculture wouldn’t be what it is today if it hadn’t rethought its historical devotion to small-scale farming.

You’ve got the cart before the horse here. We’ve lost millions of family operations. This doesn’t mean that we’re starving here in Europe, but we have lost these sources of income as well as the nutritional diversity that we now put great effort into designing with chemical additives, or by releasing gluten- and lactose-free versions of products. And now we want to stop that, because it’s not economically viable in other regions of the world. Even in Germany, there is more consensus as a result of the Commission on the Future of Agriculture held by the BMEL, where it was agreed that we need more family operations in agriculture. So if an agricultural nation like Germany is rethinking its course, why can’t this happen globally? This is taking place despite all of our criticism at the CFS in Rome.

 


So what is the purpose of the food system summit in your opinion? To disempower the CFS?

That’s exactly it! Ideally, they want the CFS to become more submissive to the goals of the agricultural industry and export nations. Furthermore, the UNFSS Academic Advisory Council, led by Joachim von Braun, is effectively trying to abolish, or at least financially drain, the scientific panel of the CFS (the HLPE) by calling for billions of dollars of investment in a UNFSS “scientific panel” for industry-affiliated research. It’s just as important for academia, industry and certain nation states to reduce the voice and influence of civil-society groups and smallholders by cherry-picking research questions, methods and results.

 

Industry-affiliated science is greatly inconvenienced by the fact that the HLPE’s scientific recommendations, such as focussing on agroecology, do not reach those they are meant to reach, and thus do little to secure profits for agricultural corporations.

 

Meanwhile, the HLPE has released 15 well-substantiated reports with recommendations for nation states’ agricultural programmes, which cover numerous areas, from fishing and animal husbandry to dietary recommendations. These favour local markets, small-scale producers and rich, location-based food diversity with the aim of creating sustainable, disaster-proof food systems that reduce poverty and contribute to ending world hunger. There is a global trend towards agroecology, largely as a result of the 2008 International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD), which 800 scientists signed off on with the backing of the World Bank and the UN. That was a new experience for everyone, us included; we were at an earlier stage of our organic-farming journey back then. We recognised that this is too small-scale and thus cannot realistically replace industrial agriculture as a global food system. We recognised the need for an open system to make location-specific decisions for sustainable production. This is a holistic principle that spans beyond agriculture and includes education and social issues.

 


The word “holism” was bandied around a lot at the summit. Do you think that also involves the use of synthetic fertilisers and pesticides in Africa?

Agroecology means ceasing, or not commencing, use of synthetic fertilisers and pesticides. Use of these products is incompatible with sustainability and a holistic approach to biodiversity, and directly contradicts the One Health approach promoted by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). As regards the use of synthetic fertilisers and pesticides, we have published two comprehensive studies on the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) over the last two years, both of which clearly demonstrated that this approach to fighting hunger has been unsuccessful. The fact that AGRA officials hold prominent positions in the UNFSS is one of the fundamental problems of the UNFSS.

 


Now it seems that the Rome-based agencies will be solely responsible for the further processes emerging from the Food Systems Summit. Is the CFS involved in that?

That was our hope, but the closer we get to the summit, the more effort is being made to establish a follow-up process designed to compete with the CFS. The BMZ is clearly acting in accordance with the wishes of the UN Special Envoy and the Chair of the Academic Advisory Council, and is expressing support for the continued work of this UNFSS Secretariat. I cannot understand why the BMZ is allowing the CFS and its humanitarian approach to be hamstrung by competition from the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, which represents Germany at the CFS, just so that it can have a seat at the table in New York.  That’s an absolute affront compared to the comparatively inclusive approach we’ve seen for the past eight years in the BMZ’s One World – No Hunger initiative. Since it’s already clear after the pre-summit that this mishmash of ideas won’t lead to a new approach, this BMZ-backed resumption of proceedings is a disappointment that only serves to counteract the positive experiences from the last few years at the One World – No Hunger initiative. The UNFSS Academic Advisory Board continues to ignore the existence of any blind spots in issues of food production and the environment, when the reality is that we have very little idea of what the future holds and need to make projections.

 

Hunger isn’t an agricultural issue, and it’s not an issue of insufficient production, because we already produce far more than we need.

 

We could feed 10 to 11 billion people 4,000 calories per day with the food that we currently produce.

 


But these calories aren’t going where they need to. And people aren’t getting calories from the right sources.

Exactly, it’s an issue of poverty and distribution.

 

And it’s an agricultural issue, too.

No, if you live in a city – let’s say Lagos for example – where many people are starving despite the supermarket shelves being full, then there is enough food, but it’s unaffordable for too many people. When a smallholder doesn’t have any means of transport and half of their crop perishes, this isn’t a production issue, it’s a transport issue. Add to that largescale industrial production of livestock feed, agrofuels and bioplastics, which yield greater profit than food for people. This means an ever-increasing proportion of global harvests is not being used to feed hungry people, but instead ending up in animals’ stomachs, fuel tanks or production lines for packaging of convenience foods. We don’t need any new scientific discoveries in order to identify and tackle these problems, we just need to finally act on existing findings and stop engaging in obviously harmful behaviours. But the summit avoids regulations by making everything voluntary.

 


What will happen in the future? Will you not attend the summit in New York?

Probably not. It remains unclear what the results of the pre-summit have been, and how the recommendations from the action tracks will be considered in New York. We are not explicitly calling for a boycott, but the less that comes out of it, the less of a harmful influence it will have.

 

For us, it’s important that the CFS is not just there to make up the numbers.

 

It should be granted more influence in its role. We remain hopeful that the BMZ will eventually make the right decision and end its involvement with this masquerade known as the UNFSS. And of course we’re approaching the German federal elections, which will see both ministries undergo a change of leadership. We will make the case for the new federal government to scrutinise and bring to an end the current course of action both in parliament and coalition talks. We are confident, because every party has advocated for an agroecological orientation to development cooperation in the run-up to this election. The BMZ can no longer take a back seat on this issue.

 


Isn’t it also possible for the summit to strengthen the CFS?

First of all, any resolutions that result from the summit should not be binding for the CFS, which will hold its own conference three weeks later with many of the same people in attendance. Of course, we’d welcome and sign off on a lot of proposals tabled at the summit, for example on issues surrounding the significance of small-scale fishing for global nutrition. If these issues are incorporated into the remit of the Committee, it can be strengthened. However, there are many issues that the CFS doesn’t deal with appropriately due to its institutional weaknesses and underfunding, especially when it comes to the Academic Advisory Council. I’m hopeful the CFS will receive a boost, because until now its development has been hindered by national governments. Maybe they will recognise that the structure being strived for already exists, including in Germany.

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Our Food Systems are in Urgent Need of Crisis-Proofing: what needs to be done

An Artikel by TMG

Based on a scientific study by TMG Think Tank, the authors highlight various challenges in the fight against the hunger crisis. The findings show that climate change, conflict and covid-19 are increasing food and energy prices.

 

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New UN Biodiversity Agreement

A Contribution by Rural 21

Nations adopted four goals and 23 targets for 2030 to foster biodiversity conservation and counter acceleration in the global rate of species extinction at the UN Biodiversity Conference (COP15).

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"Human capital will play a pivotal role in the transformation of African economies"

A contribution by Ben Leyka

The potential the African food sector holds is still far too strongly associated with the continent’s natural resources, Ben Leyka maintains. He seeks to change this with the African Agri Council.

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And a semicolon in the middle

A contribution by Jan Rübel

After a two-year break due to Corona, the doors of the International Green Week (IGW) in Berlin are opening again. From 20th to 29th January, visitors from all over the world can discover, marvel and taste the produce. But the event is not only feasting and fun. The BMZ stand asks questions about where food comes from & where it goes – and in the process becomes a crash test for many habits.

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The importance of water for sustainable rural development

A contribtion by WE4F

How can the challenges related to water, rural development and climate resilient agriculture be addressed? What innovations need to be promoted? The Water and Energy for Food (WE4F) initiative presents strategies and innovations for sustainable, integrated water management in German and international cooperation.

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From reaction to action

A contribtion by GIZ

A Year of Multiple Crises: Russian war against Ukraine, extreme weather events, high prices for energy and fertilizer, food crisis had severe implications for food security and agriculture globally and especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. A Transformation of the food systems is needed.

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New legal initiatives towards deforestation-free supply chains as a game changer

A Contribution by Gerhard Langenberger

Regarding deforestation free supply chains, there are challenges and opportunities for smallholder farmers as well as for international forest governance. Also, responsibilities for companies and potential incentives for manufacturers to use materials from fair trade and sustainable sources need to be explored. But what does “deforestation-free” actually mean?

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2022, a year of crisis – What does it mean for African trade and food security?

A Contribution by Ousmane Badiane

The Africa Agriculture Trade Monitor 2022 (AATM) was published by IFPRI and AKADEMIYA2063. The report analyses the short- and long-term trends and drivers of African agricultural trade flows, including regional policies and the role of global markets.

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How the War against Ukraine Destabilizes Global Grain Markets

A Contribution by GIZ

Since early February 2022, two of the biggest grain and oilseed exporters have been at war. An overview, which countries are affected most severely by the destabilized grain markets, and what comes next.

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Controversy: Do supply chains need liability rules?

Discussion about the potential supply chain law

The German government is struggling to pass a supply chain law. It is intended to address violations of human rights, social and environmental standards. What would the consequences be for business? A double interview with Veselina Vasileva from GEPA and economics professor Andreas Freytag.

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5 Questions for Jann Lay: What is Corona doing to the economy?

Interview with Jann Lay (GIGA)

The Corona pandemic is hitting economies around the world very hard - but developments in African countries are quite diverse. There are different speeds, resiliences and vulnerabilities. What are the reasons for this? Apl. Prof. Jann Lay of the GIGA Institute provides answers.

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Sustainable, feminist and socially just: The new Africa strategy of the BMZ

A contribution by Prof. Dr. Anna-Katharina Hornidge

In the video format "#99SecondsWith" of the German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS), Prof. Dr Anna - Katharina Hornidge talks about the new Africa-Strategy of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

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Do import restrictions really benefit the local poor in West Africa?

A contribution by Isabel Knößlsdorfer

Protectionist policies like tariffs supposedly protect domestic producers if they cannot compete with cheaper imported products. Some African countries have therefore opted to impose such import restrictions for a number of products. For the case of chicken imports in Ghana, this study analyses whether restrictions would lead to overall positive or negative welfare effects among households.

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Sang'alo Institute invests in farming of sunflower crop

A contribution by James Wanzala

Kenya is a large importer of vetable oils mainly from Indonesia and Malaysia - amongst them sunflower oil. Due to the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine, there were supply bottlenecks and food shortages, leading to less affordable vegetable oils in Kenya. As a response to the lack of supply, the Sanga'alo Institute of Science and Technology, took that impulse, teamed up with the GIZ and established regional cultivation and refinement of sunflowers.

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Farmers' organizations want to be involved in designing agricultural policy

An interview with Kolyang Palebele

Four interviews kick off the relaunch under the new name „Food4Transformation“, asking the same questions from different perspectives. "Women and young people need access to land. And they need financial support to cultivate this land." - says Kolyang Palebele, President of the Pan African Farmers Organisation (PAFO).

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Agricultural policy belongs in prime time

An interview with Dr. Julia Köhn

Four interviews kick off the relaunch under the new name „Food4Transformation“, asking the same questions from different perspectives. Dr Julia Köhn, Chair of the German AgriFood Society, points out in the interview: Only if innovation and transformation are profitable in the medium term can they close the food gap in the long term.

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BMZ releases video on the transformation of agricultural and food systems

A contribution by GIZ

The Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) has released a video on the transformation of agricultural and food systems. In the video, Federal Minister Svenja Schulze also speaks about the urgent need to combat global hunger and contribute to resilient agricultural and food systems.

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“More of the same is not enough - we need to rethink”

An interview with Dirk Meyer

Four interviews kick off the relaunch under the new name „Food4Transformation“, asking the same questions from different perspectives. Dirk Meyer, Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, thinks: less individual solutions are needed, but more systemic approaches. Because in addition to the goals for food security, the issues of climate and biodiversity must also be taken into account.

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Unlocking the potential of agrivoltaics

A contribution by Fraunhofer Institute

Agrivoltaics is a concept that combines photovoltaic electricity generation and agricultural production, providing the opportunity for a more efficient land use and contributing overall to the integration of food, energy and water systems. This can be particularly interesting for countries in the Global South, where rural electrification rates are often low and food security needs to be improved.

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Partners for change - Network meeting on transforming agricultural and food systems

A Contribution by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development

At the network meeting "Partners for change - Transformation to a food secure, resilient and sustainable future", almost 250 participants from over 20 countries came together to exchange experiences and ideas on the transformation of agricultural and food systems. The final product, joint recommendations to transform agricultural and food systems, can now be read online.

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Just change starts with listening

A Contribution by Jan Rübel

Halfway through the 2030 Agenda, the BMZ invited participants to a network meeting entitled "Partners for change - Transformation to a food secure, resilient and sustainable future". Experts from around the world developed recommendations in a consultation process and then consolidated them in Berlin. A site visit.

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What is needed for a long-term fertiliser strategy?

A contribution by Michael Brüntrup

The world is currently experiencing a historic food crisis. High fertiliser prices are part of the problem. In addition to the necessary short-term aid measures, the crisis ought to be made use of to develop and implement longer-term fertiliser strategies for sustainable, in particular smallholder increases in production in the Global South.

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Think20 Policy Brief centres on Agroecology

Insights from the T20 Policy Brief

Given the urgency of transforming agricultural and food systems, GIZ India's Food Systems and Agroecology Working Group is exploring the potential of agroecology in collaboration with Think20 partners. A policy brief has now been published.

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New campaign for women: "Poverty is sexist"

Interview with Stephan Exo-Kreischer

This is a benchmark for everybody: More rights for women are a very influencing solution in the struggle against extreme poverty and hunger worldwide, says Stephan Exo-Kreischer, Director of ONE Germany. The organisation specialises in political campaigning as a lever for sustainable change.

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Africa's rapid economic transformation

A report by T. S. Jayne, A. Adelaja and R. Mkandawire

Thirty years ago, Africa was synonymous with war, famine and poverty. That narrative is clearly outdated. African living standards are rising remarkably fast. Our authors are convinced that improving education and entrepreneurship will ensure irreversible progress in the region even as it confronts COVID-19.

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© AHA

The farmes themselves are the benchmark

A contribution by Andreas Quiring

Strong farmes are the key to a self-determined, sustainable development. Social innovations can help make the farmers’ actual needs the benchmark.

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Kakaoernte

Doing More With Less

A contribution by Jochen Moninger

Innovation is the only way to end hunger worldwide by the deadline we have set ourselves. The secret lies in networking and sharing ideas – and several initiatives are already leading by example.

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Quinoa could have a huge potential in Central Asia, where the Aral Sea Basin has been especially hard-hit by salinisation.

Supermarket Scorecard on Human Rights

A contribution by Dr. Franziska Humbert (Oxfam)

Oxfam’s supermarket scorecard, which is in its third year, shows one thing in particular - it works! Supermarkets can change their business policies and focus more on the rights of those people around the world who plant and harvest food. However, this does not happen without pressure. 

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Video diaries in the days of Corona: Voices from the ground

A contribution by Sarah D´haen & Alexander Müller, Louisa Nelle, Bruno St. Jaques, Sarah Kirangu-Wissler and Matteo Lattanzi (TMG)

Young farmers’ insights on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on food systems in Sub-Saharan Africa @CovidFoodFuture and video diaries from Nairobi’s informal settlements.

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(c) Thomas Lohnes / Brot für die Welt

The hype about urban gardening: farmers or hobby gardeners?

A contribution by Stig Tanzmann

Urban gardening is becoming increasingly popular in northern metropoles. People who consider themselves part of a green movement are establishing productive gardens in the city, for example on rooftops or in vacant lots. In severely impoverished regions of the global South, urban agriculture is a component of the food strategy.

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A new U.S. Africa policy?

An article by Jan Rübel

After four years of Donald Trump in the White House, it is time to take stock: What policies did the Republican government pursue in African regions? And what will change in favor of Joe Biden after the election decision? Here is an evaluation.

 

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Good health is impossible without healthy food

A contribution by Heino von Meyer

Corona makes it even more difficult to achieve a world without hunger by 2030. So that this perspective does not get out of sight, Germany must play a stronger role internationally - a summary of the Strategic Advisory Group of SEWOH.

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No rainforest for our consumption

A contribution by Jenny Walther-Thoß (WWF)

In the tropics rainforests are still being felled for the production of palm oil, meat and furniture. It is high time to act. Proposals are on the table.

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How do you campaign “Food Systems”?

Interview with Paul Newnham, Director of the SDG 2 Advocacy Hub.

The UN Food Systems pre-Summit in Rome dealt with transforming the ways of our nutrition. How do you bring that to a broad public? Questions to Paul Newnham, the Director of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 Advocacy Hub.

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How can the private sector prevent food loss and waste?

An interview with David Brand (GIZ)

From a circular food system in Rwanda to functioning cooled transports in Kenya: The lab of tomorrow addresses development challenges such as preventing food loss and waste

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From lost products to safe food - Innovations from Zambia

A contribution by GIZ

In Zambia, innovative approaches are used to address the problem of post-harvest losses in the groundnut value chain. GIZ's Rapid Loss Appraisal Tool (RLAT) can help to develop more such approaches.

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A Climate of Hunger: How the Climate Crisis Fuels the Hunger

A photo reportage by the Zeitenspiegel agency

Every one degree Celsius rise in temperature increases the risk of conflict by two to ten percent. The climate crisis is a humanitarian crisis, as the photos by Christoph Püschner and Frank Schultze illustrate.

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‘None of the Three Traffic Light Coalition Parties is Close to the Paris Agreement’

An Interview with Leonie Bremer (FFF)

At the climate conference in Glasgow, activists from various groups protested again – Leonie Bremer from ‘Fridays for Future’ was there too. How can climate protection and development cooperation work hand in hand?

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Five tips to reduce food waste

A listicle against food waste

Whether it's banana bread made from brown bananas, conscious shopping plans or foodsharing, we give you five tips on how to reduce your everyday food waste.

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Social justice and climate justice: Fair Vibe at the Youth Climate Conference

At LCOY Germany, the local youth climate conference, views on climate protection from all political spectrums are discussed. The Fairactivists, a programme of Fairtrade Germany, participated with a panel discussion on the link between social justice and climate justice.

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Mozambique: How informal workers find jobs through an app

A Contribution by Leonie March

There are only about 1 million jobs in the East African country. The majority of the population works in the informal sector, and it can be difficult for them to find customers. Biscate offers a digital solution - without the need for internet, data or smartphones.

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Stepping into the future: How youth organisations are driving change

A contribution by Felix Chiyenda

Together they are stronger: In many African countries, young men and women are coming together to form youth organisations. These organisations help young people in rural areas to earn a living in the agricultural and food sector, creating prospects for the future in rural areas.

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Podcast: Fighting world hunger together

Chancellor Angela Merkel in the Podcast of the Federal Government

At the start of World Food Week around World Food Day on 16 October, Chancellor Angela Merkel stressed that the fight against global hunger will only be successful with international responsibility and solidarity (german only).

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“Corona exposes the weaknesses of our nutritional systems"

Interview with Arif Husain (WFP)

The United Nations plan a Food Systems Summit - and now the Corona-Virus is dictating the agenda. The Chief Economist of the UN World Food Programme takes stock of the current situation: a conversation with Jan Rübel about pandemics, about the chromosomes of development - and about the conflicts that inhibit them.

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"Pandemic increases violence against women"

Interview with Léa Rouanet

African countries still face huge gender gaps in terms of access to work and capital. What are the consequences of Corona for women in Africa? Jan Rübel interviewed Léa Rouanet on lockdowns and gender-based violence. The economist works at the Africa Gender Innovation Lab of the World Bank.

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(c) Welthungerhilfe

5 questions to F. Patterson: Why is there more hunger?

Interview with Fraser Patterson

Every year in October, the "Welthungerhilfe" aid organisation, with the Irish "Concern Worldwide" NGO, publishes the Global Hunger Index, a tool with which the hunger situation is recorded. What are the trends - and what needs to be done?

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(c) Welthungerhilfe

5 questions to S. Fan: Where are the new roads?

Interview with Shenggen Fan

Shortly before ending his position as Director General of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPR) Dr. Shenggen Fan talks about the reforms and new modes of operation needed to achieve global food security in the coming decade.

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Climate Adaptation Summit 2021: ‘We can do better’

Event report by Jan Rübel (Zeitenspiegel)

The first Climate Adaptation Summit put climate adaptation at the center of politics for the first time. The virtual meeting united global players with one goal: building resilience is just as important as climate protection itself. Around 15,000 participants discussed direct proposals.

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Resilience in times of crisis

Yemen is currently experiencing one of the worst disasters, due to war, hunger and disease outbreaks. The GIZ is locally engaged to improve the nutrition and resilience of Yemenites.

A project of GIZ

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Turning many into one: CGIAR network restructures

A contribution by Jan Rübel

International agricultural research is responding to new challenges: Their advisory group is undergoing a fundamental reform process and unites knowledge, partnerships and physical assets into OneCGIAR.

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KLAUS WOHLMANN / GIZ

"Farmers are smart"

Interview with Maria Andrade

From the lab to the masses: Maria Andrade bred varieties of biofortified sweet potatoes which are now widely used all over the continent. She sets her hope on the transformation of African agriculture.

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Small-scale farmers’ responses to COVID-19 related restrictions

A study by SLE

The lockdown due to COVID-19 hit the economy hard - including agriculture in particular with its supply chains and sales markets. What creative coping strategies have those affected found? The Seminar for Rural Development has begun a research study on th

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Small fish with a big potential

A contribution by Paul van Zwieten

African inland fisheries are increasingly reliant on the capture of small fish species that are sundried and traded over long distances. They make an important contribution in alleviating “hidden hunger”: consumed whole, small fish are an important source of micronutrients. Only that, unfortunately, politicians haven’t yet realised this.

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Building our food systems back better

A contribution by Jes Weigelt and Alexander Müller

What is required to make food systems provide sufficient, healthy food while not harming the planet? How should food security be maintained given the threat posed by climate change? Our authors look at some aspects of tomorrow’s food systems against the backdrop of the corona crisis.

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"We must mobilise all available resources"

A contribution by Ismahane Elouafi (ICBA)

Freshwater deficits are affecting more and more people throughout the world. In order to counter this, our global food system will have to change, our author maintains. A case for more research on alternative crops and smart water solutions.

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Do we have to dare a new food system?

A contribution by Dr. Felix zu Löwenstein (BÖLW)

Lack of seasonal workers and virus explosion in slaughterhouses, rising vegetable prices, climate crisis – all this demonstrates: Our food system is highly productive and (at least for the rich inhabitants of planet earth) guarantees an unprecedented rich and steady food supply - but it is not resilient.

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© GIZ

Resilient small-scale agriculture: A key in global crises

A contribution by Kerstin Weber and Brit Reichelt-Zolho (WWF)

Biodiversity and sustainable agriculture ensure the nutrition of whole societies. But there is more: These two factors also provide better protection against the outbreak of dangerous pandemics. Hence, the question of preserving ecosystems is becoming a global survival issue.

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(c) Klara Palatova/WFP

A global signpost: What way is the market, please?

A contribution by the World Food Programme

There is a clear global task: We need to feed nine billion people by 2050. We, the people of Earth, must produce more food and waste less. That is the top priority of the UN World Food Programme (WFP), too - the description of a challenge.

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The Forest Maker and his director

Double interview with Tony Rinaudo and Volker Schlöndorff

Tony Rinaudo uses conventional reforestation methods to plant millions and millions of trees – and Volker Schlöndorff is filming a cinema documentary about the Australian. The outcome so far: An educational film on behalf of the BMZ (Federal Ministry for Economic Co-operation and Development).

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The state of food security in Cape Town and St. Helena Bay

A study by Markus Hanisch, Agustina Malvido, Johanna Hansmann, Alexander Mewes, Moritz Reigl, Nicole Paganini (SLE)

Post-Covid-19 lockdown: How food governance processes could include marginalised communities - an extract of the results of an SLE study applying digital and participatory methods.

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(c) Nina Schroeder/World Food Programme

Green from the growth container

A contribution by Maria Smentek (WFP)

If there is a lack of fertile soil and rain, hunger breaks out quickly. Maria Smentek from the World Food Programme (WFP) explains how farmers and pastoralists can counter climate change with hydroponic-systems.

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(c) Gudrun Barenbrock/GIZ

Edible bugs - the new beef?

A contribution by Marwa Shumo

Insect farming is economical and environmentally sustainable, they are high in protein and they live on agricultural waste. Marwa Abdel Hamid Shumo thinks: They are the best weapon to combat hunger

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How the self-help approach empowers smallholder women

A report by INEF and Kindernothilfe

Supporting groups of smallholding women substantially contributes to strengthen rural operations economically. The organisation and associated group activities can help to reduce extreme poverty and improve the food situation.

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Gender equality: Essential for food and nutrition security

A contribution by Carsta Neuenroth (BfdW)

The majority of producers in developing countries are women. Although they contribute significantly to the food security of their families, they remain chronically disadvantaged in male-dominated agriculture in terms of access to land, credit, technology and education.

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Success story allotment garden: Food supply and women's empowerment

A contribution by Nadine Babatounde and Anne Floquet (MISEREOR)

To prevent malnutrition among young children and strengthen the role of women in their communities, Misereor, together with the local non-governmental organisation CEBEDES, is implementing a programme on integrated home gardens in Benin - a series of pictures.

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Hunger must not be a consequence of the epidemic!

A contribution by Michael Brüntrup (DIE)

Even though COVID-19 poses a threat to the health of humanity, the reaction to the pandemic must not cause more suffering than the disease itself. This is particularly relevant for poor developing countries, where the impact of the corona crisis on food security is even more severe!

 

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Developing countries hit doubly hard by coronavirus

A contribution by Gunter Beger (BMZ)

In most African countries, the infection COVID-19 is likely to trigger a combined health and food crisis. This means: In order to cope with this unprecedented crisis, consistently aligning our policies to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is more important than ever, our author maintains.

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Hier steht eine Bildbeschreibung

Statement from GAFSP Co-Chairs: GAFSP and COVID-19 Pandemic

A contribution by GAFSP

COVID-19 has unprecedented effects on the world. As always, the most vulnerable are the hardest hit, both at home and - especially - abroad. A joint appeal by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Development and Cooperation (BMZ) and the Department for International Development (DFID).

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An investment in Africa's future

A contritbution by Essa Chanie Mussa (University of Gondar)

Rural youth need viable livelihood opportunities to escape out of poverty and realize their aspirations. How could they be helped to fully unleash their potential? This is an aloud call that needs novel strategies among governments, policy makers, and international development partners and donors.

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(c) Privat

Borderless food security

A contribution by Christine Wieck

Enabling smallholders to trade across regions and borders promotes food security and economic growth. Although everyone is calling for exactly that, implementation is still difficult

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© GIZ

Actual Analysis: The locusts came with the crises

A report by Bettina Rudloff and Annette Weber (SWP)

The Corona-Virus exacerbates existing crises through conflict, climate, hunger and locusts in East Africa and the Horn of Africa. What needs to be done in these regions? To face these challenges for many countries, all of these crises need to be captured in their regional context.

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"Extreme is the new normal"

A report by Alexander Müller and Jes Weigelt (TMG)

As the climate changes, the population of Africa is growing and fertile land and jobs are becoming scarcer. New ways are currently leading to urbanisation of agriculture and a new mid-sized sector in the countryside

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© GIZ / Angelika Jacob

This is how developing countries can adapt better to droughts

A contribution by Michael Brüntrup (DIE) und Daniel Tsegai (UNCCD)

Droughts are the natural disasters with far-reaching negative consequences. While rich countries are still vulnerable to drought, famines are no longer found.

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(c) Christof Krackhardt/Brot für die Welt

Together and resourceful against worldwide hunger

A contribution by Brot für die Welt

Climate change disturbs the climate in Ethiopia. The answer from small farmers in the northern region is convincing: diversify!

 

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(c) Christoph Mohr/GIZ

Microinsurance against climate change

A contribution by Claudia Voß

Climate change is destroying development progress in many places. The clever interaction of digitalisation and the insurance industry protects affected small farmers.

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(c) Nina Schroeder/World Food Programme

Hunger is caused by people, not the climate

Interview with Jacob Schewe (PIK)

A study by the World Bank predicts that millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa will have to leave their homelands because of climate change. We have spoken with one of the authors

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What do you expect from this Pre Summit, Mr. Haddad?

Interview with Lawrence Haddad (GAIN)

Nutrition experts from all over the world are coming together in Rome. They are not only distilling 2000 ideas to improve food systems - they are also preparing for the big UN summit in New York in September. An interview. 

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Mr. Campari, how do we create sustainable food systems?

Interview with Joao Campari (WWF)

Journalist Jan Rübel spoke with Joao Campari ahead of the UNFSS Pre-Summit. The Chair of Action Track 3 highlights key challenges in transforming existing food systems towards sustainable production and shares his expectations for the Summit.

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Land Rights, Gender and Soil Fertility in Benin

A contribution by Dr. Karin Gaesing and Prof. Dr. Frank Bliss (INEF)

Especially in densely populated areas, land pressure leads to overexploitation of available land and a lack of conservation measures. The West African country of Benin, with heavily depleted soils in many places, is no exception.

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UNFSS Pre-Summit: What did it achieve?

Interview with Martina Fleckenstein (WWF), Michael Kühn (WHH) and Christel Weller-Molongua (GIZ)

After the summit means pre-summit: It was the first time that the United Nations held a summit on food systems. Martina Fleckenstein, Michael Kühn and Christel Weller-Molongua reviewed the situation in this joint interview.

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Food System Transformation Starts and Ends with Diversity

A Contribution by Emile Frison and Nick Jacobs (IPES-Food)

While having failed to solve the hunger problem, industrial agriculture appears to be causing additional ones both in environmental and health terms. Emile Frison and Nick Jacobs call for a transformation.

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(c) GIZ

Sustainable Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in Rural Areas

Fish is important for combating malnutrition and undernourishment. But it is not only notable for its nutritional value, but also secures the livelihoods and employment for 600 million people worldwide.

A Project of GIZ

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(c) GIZ

Land Rights for Secure Livelihoods: My Land is My Life

Three quarters of the world's population do not have secure land rights, which hinders investment and innovation. The project "Improvement of Livelihood and Food Security" supports smallholder farmers in acquiring land.

A project of GIZ

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City, Country, Sea: 6 Innovations in the Fight Against Climate Change

A listicle for climate-neutral agriculture

Vertically growing plants, magnetic cotton. Hairy leftovers fertilizing fields, tractors running on algae? These six innovations could lead agriculture’s next Green Revolution!

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No Food Security Without Climate Protection

A Contribution by Michael Kühn (WHH)

Climate change already affects the daily lives of people in the Global South. What are the challenges they face and what do these imply for negotiations at the climate conference in Glasgow?

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Engaging the Community to Solve the Bushmeat Crisis

A Contribution by the Forestry Research Institute Nigeria

The 'Domestication of Small Monogastric and Ruminant Animals' (DSMR) project led by a Nigerian research institute works with local communities to solve the bushmeat crisis.

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German G7 Presidency – fighting hunger with all our might

A Contribution by Welthungerhilfe

In the run-up to the G7 summit, experts from politics and civil society discussed sustainable and more effective options for action by the G7 states to combat hunger.

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‘Invite yourself’ – Farmers organisations as key stakeholders of food systems

A Contribution by Andreas-Hermes-Akademie

The Andreas Hermes Academy (AHA) discusses the transformation of food systems with 30 representatives of farmers organisations.

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The lessons learned from the last food crisis - A solution?

A Contribution by Agnes Kalibata

Inadequacy and fragility of food systems becomes more apparent with every food crisis. The question we must answer is “Where do we go from here?”

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From shared conviction to global response

A Contribution by Jan Rübel

The G7 is responding to the worsening global hunger crisis by mobilizing an additional $4.5 billion for this year alone. A key milestone for this in the run-up was the international conference on global food security "Uniting for Global Food Security".

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‘Preserving and restoring fertile soils is a global responsibility.’

An Interview with Jochen Flasbarth (BMZ)

Healthy, productive soils are a prerequisite for global food security – one of the priorities of German development cooperation. State Secretary Jochen Flasbarth on Germany’s efforts to support sustainable land management and why the VGGT are more important than ever today.

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Scaling up Food Security

An Artikel by Jan Rübel

How can we reach more people with successful approaches to food security? In Berlin, an international conference organized by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationaler Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) addressed this issue.

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What does it take to truly shift the paradigm on food systems?

An Interview by GDPRD

Why are short- and long-term responses important to address current and future global crises? Sebastian Lesch, Head of the Agriculture Division at the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), provides answers to these and other questions in an interview with the Global Donor Platform for Rural Development (GDPRD) and explains how much Germany welcomes all donors pulling together and acting in concert.

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Strengthening food markets across the rural-urban continuum

A Contribution by Thomas Forster

How to maintain functioning food markets in global food supply chains in the face of vulnerability and disruption? Markets that support local and territorial food systems are part of the solution. Thomas Forster presents proposals for these markets to cope with future shocks.

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A dashboard as a key tool for global food security

A Contribution by BMZ

The Global Alliance for Food Security (GAFS), jointly launched by the German G7 Presidency and the World Bank, released the Global Food and Nutrition Security Dashboard during COP27: A Rapid Response Tool for Coordinating Global Action for Food Security.

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Five Questions for Dirk Meyer

An Interview with Dirk Meyer (BMZ)

Development cooperation needs to place good governance and a sustainable agri-food systems transformation at its center: After the first 100 days in office have passed, Dirk Meyer from the German Development Ministry (BMZ) spells out the goals, guidelines and priorities of the Ministry’s new lead.

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The Black Sea Breadbasket in Crisis: Facts and Figures

An infographic by ONEWORLD no Hunger

Rising food and gas prices, physical destruction and supply chain disruptions: Why the Black Sea region matters and how the war in Ukraine affects global food security.

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Fair Trade and Climate Justice: Everything is Conntected

A Contribution of the 'Initiative for Sustainable Agricultural Supply Chains' (INA)

Fair Trade organisations and the Initiative for Sustainable Agricultural Supply Chains (INA) have launched the #ichwillfair campaign during COP26 to highlight the link between global supply chains and climate change.

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The Rice Sector in West Africa: A Political Challenge

New insights on trade and value addition in the rice sector in West Africa

Low import tariffs, smuggling activities, unpredictable tax exemptions and weak enforcement of food safety standards: The potential of local rice value chains is undermined in West African countries.

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The goals of transformation should leave no one behind

An Interview with Mareike Haase and Stig Tanzmann

Four interviews kick off the relaunch under the new name „Food4Transformation“, asking the same questions from different perspectives. Mareike Haase and Stig Tanzmann from Brot für die Welt explain why the right to food, inclusivity, agroecology and food sovereignty are the central levers for a successful transformation.

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Agricultural prices and food security – a complex relationship

A Contribution by Dr. Fatima Olanike Kareem and Dr. Olayinka Idowu Kareem

High agricultural prices affect developed and developing countries alike, but the problem is aggravated for the latter through the lack of or inadequate resilience measures. Dr. Fatima Olanike Kareem, AKADEMIYA2063, and Dr. Olayinka Idowu Kareem, University of Hohenheim, explain what can be done to mitigate the negative effects on food security.

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Strengthening the market linkages of smallholders in the face of global supply shocks

A Contribution by Niladri Sekhar Bagchi

The consequences of the Russian invasion of Ukraine have enabled many countries to open up new export markets for their agricultural goods. However, smallholder farms have been largely left out. Drawing on his experience in India, our author gives a brief overview of how this can be changed.

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Innovative donor approaches and sustainable finance – A Review of UNFSS+2

A contribution by the Global Donor Platform for Rural Development

Two years following the UN Food Systems Summit, the Global Donor Platform for Rural Development and the Shamba Centre for Food & Climate hosted an official side event at the UNFSS+2. The event explored how public donors can increase the impact of their investments.

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“It created hope. It created a life”

An interview with Ally-Raza Qureshi, WFP

Iraq suffered many years of war, sanctions and economic crises. However, Ally-Raza Qureshi from the World Food Programme in Iraq sees progress. But now the effects of climate change are becoming apparent in the country. What is to be done?

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New Podcast – Out now!

A Podcast by Food4Transformation

In a world facing crises – from pandemics, armed conflicts, and climate change – how do we ensure everyone has enough food within planetary boundaries? A new podcast by Food4Transformation discover solutions talking to government officials, scientists, NGOs and farmers around the world.

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What the Middle East conflict means for the children in Gaza

An Interview by Jan Rübel

The Gaza Strip depends heavily on humanitarian aid, more than ever with the current war. Gaza population is very young: Half of them are children. What is their situation on the ground? Questions for Lucia Elmi, Unicef Special Representative to the State of Palestine.

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Agricultural Financing – from a broader Perspective

A Contribution by GIZ

In Sub-Saharan Africa, not all financial institutions (FIs) have access to knowledge about how to implement processes to enhance rural financial inclusion. The pan-African Community of Practice (CoP) plays a pivotal role in supporting these institutions along this transformative journey.

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Agriculture is more than Culture or Tradition

A Contribution by Simeon Kambalame

How can agriculture engage more young people in rural areas? Advocacy and education campaigns can play an important role here. Simeon Kambalame, Timveni Child and Youth Media Organisation, has launched such a campaign in Malawi.

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Gender Justice – a Precondition for Resilience

A contribution by IFPRI

Women and girls in poorer countries are affected in particular ways by the multiple crises the world is currently facing. Uncovering the linkages between gender, resilience and food security, experts from International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) look at ways to support women and girls’ capacity to respond to crises.

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Where can international cooperation in Gaza come in, Ms. Asseburg?

An Interview by Jan Rübel

The armed conflict between Israeli forces and the Hamas is escalating. What does this mean for a Gaza, region that was already heavily dependent on external aid? Questions for Dr. Muriel Asseburg, Senior Fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) in Berlin.

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Nature conservation around the world

A Contribution by WWF

From measures to promote biodiversity in Germany to more sustainable cocoa cultivation methods in Ecuador: WWF works at many different levels. At the Green Week, it will be demonstrated just how multifaceted nature conservation work is and what role each individual's decision plays.

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Together for food security in Zambia

A Contribution by Claudia Jordan (GIZ)

The Agriculture and Food Security Cluster of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH in Zambia shows how synergies among different projects and partner organisations can help people to eat healthier, diversified food. A delegation of the Bonn based Division of Agriculture and Rural Development learned this in a field visit in the Eastern Province of the Southern African country.

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Felix Phiri and two decades of Agriculture

A Conversation with Felix Phiri

Felix Phiri has been Head of the Department of Nutrition, HIV and AIDS at the Ministry of Health in Malawi for almost 20 years. A conversation about constants and change.

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Climate Resilience in the Apple Value Chain

A Contribution by Puneet Bansal

In Himachal Pradesh, India, natural disasters are becoming more frequent and climatic conditions are changing – with negative consequences for apple production and farmers' livelihoods. Holistic and multidimensional innovation bundles are required for the entire value chain in order to make the food system more resilient in the future.

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“Healthy ground brings good and many fruits”

Interview with Ben Sekamatte and Boaz Ogola

Africa's cotton production plays a key role in the fight against poverty. The "Cotton Made in Africa" initiative promotes sustainable cultivation - one element of which is the use of organic pesticides. Entomologist Ben Sekamatte and cotton company manager Boaz Ogola talked with Jan Rübel about soil and yields.

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A classroom in the Garden of Eden

By Iris Manner

Deforestation harms people and the environment. With nurseries, farmers can earn money and do good. You just have to know how to do it

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Support for sustainable start-ups

Companies in Africa that need financing between $20,000 and $200,000 find relatively few investors, as this sector is too large for microcredit and too small for institutional investors. This creates a "gap in the middle" where companies have limited options. A project of the World Resource Institute provides a remedy with the Landaccelerator 2020.

A World Resources Institute project

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Mr. Samimi, what is environmental change doing to Africa?

Interview with Cyrus Samimi (IAS)

Environmental change is having a particularly strong impact on the African continent. Its landscapes see both negative and positive processes. What is science's view of this? A conversation with Cyrus Samimi about mobility for livelihoods, urban gardening and dealing with nature.

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© GIZ

One Health – What we are learning from the Corona crisis

A contribution by Dr. May Hokan and Dr. Arnulf Köhncke (WWF)

Due to the coronavirus crisis, the connection between human and animal health has gained new attention. Politicians and scientists are joining forces to propagate the solution: One Health. But what is behind the concept? And can it also guarantee food security for all people worldwide?

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Ms Rudloff, what are the benefits of a supply chain law?

By Jan Rübel

The Federal Government is fine-tuning a law that would require companies to ensure human rights – a supply chain law. What are the consequences for the agricultural sector? Dr Bettina Rudloff from the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) discusses linking policy fields with added value.

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Freed from trade? Towards a fairer EU Trade Agenda

A contribution by Dr. Jan Orbie (University Gent)

‘Fair’ and ‘sustainable’ are key words in Germany’s EU Council Presidency. At the same time, Germany pursues ‘modernization’ of the WTO and ‘rapid progress’ on free trade agreements. Are these goals really compatible? Can we be concerned about fairness and sustainability while continuing with ‘business as usual’?

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Can we win the race against deforestation?

Interview with Bernadette Arakwiye und Salima Mahamoudou (World Resources Institute)

Deforestation is leading to a shortage of ressources. What are the options for counteracting? A conversation with Bernadette Arakwiye and Salima Mahamoudou about renaturation and the possibilities of artificial intelligence.

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From Berlin to Yen Bai: 10,000 trees for Vietnam

A contribution by GIZ and BMZ

It began with clicks at a trade fair and ends with concrete reforestation: a campaign at the Green Week in Berlin is now enriching the forests of the Yen Bai Province in Vietnam. A chronicle of an education about climatic relevance to concrete action - and about the short distances on our planet.

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Diversity Is the Fundamental Principle to Use

An Interview with Shakuntala Thilsted

A conversation with aquatic researcher Shakuntala Thilsted on the long-neglected nutrition benefits of aquatic diets and the empowering qualities of a sustainable aqua-food systems transformation.

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Food security is more than production volumes and high yields

A Contribution by Adrian Muller, Catherine Pfeifer and Jürn Sanders (FiBL)

Taking Biodiversity Focus Areas under production or abandoning lower yielding, more extensive production systems is the wrong approach to mastering the looming global food crisis, say the authors of the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL).

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The fight against illegal fishing

A Report

The oceans are important for our food supply, but they are overfished. To halt this trend the global community is now taking action against illegal fishing. Journalist Jan Rübel spoke with Francesco Marí, a specialist for world food, agricultural trade and maritime policy at "Brot für die Welt," and others.

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Five climate-friendly methods in agriculture

A Listicle for climate protection and adaptation

These five management practices can increase agricultural production and contribute to climate change mitigation and adaptation.

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Working with nature for diversity in farming, climate protection and empowerment

Ein Beitrag von Friederike Bauer

Germany joins the international Agroecology Coalition, reinforcing its commitment to fair, sustainable agriculture and ensuring the future viability of rural areas. By adopting a holistic approach, agroecology is helping to address the greatest challenges of our time: protecting the climate, combating hunger and preserving biodiversity.

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The UNFSS Stocktaking – shadow and a little light

A Contribution by Harry Hoffmann (TMG) & Nathalie Demel (WHH)

At the halfway mark of the 2030 Agenda and two years after the UN Food System Summit 2021, a stocktaking moment was held in Rome to analyze the progress of countries on the commitments to action in transforming food systems. Dr Harry Hoffmann, TMG Think Tank, and Nathalie Demel, Welthungerhilfe, were on site and take stock as well.

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Climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies for the African livestock sector

A Contribution by ILRI and GIZ

The production of animal-source foods is becoming increasingly difficult due to the impact of climate change on the livestock sector in Africa. Though, Livestock make a crucial contribution to food security in Africa. Three papers by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), GIZ, ILRI and World Bank analyze, how Africas future livestock sector can look like.

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The Insect Whisperer

A Contribution by Jan Rübel and Zain Jafar

Agriculture is coming under pressure worldwide: bacteria, viruses and insects are causing problems for crops. In Palestine, Dr. Rana Samara from the Palestinian Academy of Science and Technology is researching solutions to the problem. And she finds them in nature itself.

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Blooming landscapes? Only with biodiversity!

A Contribution by Arne Loth

What do chocolate, carrots and tequila have in common? What sounds like the ingredients for an experimental cocktail are foods that would not exist without certain animal species. They are examples of how nature works for us every day, often behind the scenes.

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Human Rights, Land and Rural Development

A contribution by Michael Windfuhr (German Institute for Human Rights)

Land rights are no longer governed by the law of the strongest. That is what the international community has agreed to. Governments and private companies have a duty to respect human rights and avoid corruption.

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Feminist development policy – A new beginning?

An Interview by Journalist Jan Rübel

Cameroonian gender and peace activist Marthe Wandou on the role of women and girls in development policy – then and in the future.

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